#Burned

Currently Reading: Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand and A Storm of Swords (Song of Fire and Ice book 3) by George R.R. Martin

Books Read: 10

TBR List: 4999

Words Written:

 

Well the new year is off to a good start writing and reading wise. I haven’t made many new posts on here though. I also haven’t written anything more on Finding Family. So I’m feeling a bit bad on the resolutions I made.

I’m also beginning to feel burned out with my writing again. I don’t know if it is I’ve just been putting too much into this one story I’ve started, my meds have stopped working or what but I’m having issues continuing writing for the past couple of days.

Upside though, I have two books very close to publishing. I think that is a good start to the year. More than last year.

I have picked out the book I’m going to work on for Camp NaNoWriMo in April. I would just like a better title for it, but I kind of love the title I have picked out at the same time.

5 Mistakes Authors Make on Social Media

A Writer's Path

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by Michael Cristiano

I thought writing a novel was the hard part. I thought endless drafting and editing and proofreading involved the most work when it came to being a writer.

I was wrong. My debut novel has been on sale for a little less than a month, and I came to the conclusion very early on in its release that writing it was the easy (and far more enjoyable) part. Why? you ask.

Marketing. Marketing is a hard and seemingly endless process. Why is it so hard?

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2 Tips For Introducing Your Protagonist

A Writer's Path

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by Kathryn

What’s wrong with this picture?

I wake up in the morning and look in the mirror, find my big green eyes crusted with sleep. I brush my beautiful brown hair and check my flawless skin for pimples, but of course I don’t have any, so I don’t need to put on any makeup. Then I walk over to my closet and put on my school uniform shirt and skirt, check my reflection one more time. Then I head down stairs for a delicious, filling breakfast.’

Obviously that paragraph is insipid to the point of hyperbolic, but it’s not like writing like this doesn’t exist.

Remember learning the concept of “show, not tell” back in elementary school?

Yes, it’s still (and always) super relevant.

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Owning Your Writing Craft

A Writer's Path

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by Tonya R. Moore

There’s all this hubbub floating around out there lately, conflicting theories of all the DOs and DON’Ts of what it takes to be or become a successful author.

Some time ago, I saw some Perpetual Writing Advice Giver actually tweet that if you’re a writer promoting your work and you don’t have this many (double digit) thousand followers on Twitter, you’re simply not trying hard enough. To add insult to offense, said party didn’t even have a half of that “strongly suggested” following.

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How to Handle Rejection

A Writer's Path

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by Tonya R. Moore

Rejection bites. That’s the plain and simple truth.

You pour your heart into a story and revise the heck out of it. Then you submit/query and repeat until hopefully, someone finally thinks that you have something worth publishing.

Unless you’re some sort of literary genius whose work always gets accepted on the very first submission, it can become quite a discouraging process.

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Why Do We Care When Characters Die?

A Writer's Path

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by Kyle Massa

Did you cry when Bambi’s mom got shot?

It’s okay. You can admit it. Though we know they’re not real, the death of fictional characters evokes real emotion in us. I find that amazing. After all, when fictional character die, we’re essentially mourning the loss of someone who does not, has not, and never will, exist.

The question is: why? Why do we care when a nonexistent character bites the dust?

I don’t claim to know the answer. But I do have some theories.

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