5 Reasons Why You Should Go to Iceland

The Love Bungalow

It’s been eight days since I returned to my bungalow from the beautiful goodness of Iceland. It’s been my dream to go to Iceland way before it was cool-it was actually a quiz question on a “How well do you know Lindsay?” game at my 14th birthday as my #1 travel destination. I ended up going a few more places before making it to the land of fire and ice, but the timing ended up being pretty perfect (we have Instagram now!) My mom (remember her from her awesome guest post?) and I have this awesome tradition where we go on a fabulous trip every couple of years. Iceland marked four years since our last trip to Ireland and Scotland and now I can’t imagine waiting FOUR MORE WHOLE YEARS before another trip together because we always have the best time and laugh and laugh and explore everything.

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Iceland is…

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Author Myths: Don’t Believe Everything You Hear

A Writer's Path

by Hope Ann

The writer’s life is surrounded by myths, both inside and out. ‘Oh, you are a writer? You must be rich?’ ‘A writer? Are you a starving artist? I didn’t think you could make any money that way.’ ‘Just write a book and put it out there, it will take off.’

So…yes. Lots of myths. So I decided to collect a few; some from Facebook, some from articles I’ve read, some from things I’ve heard or heard of so much that they are now stuck in my head.

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How to Be a Successful Writer

A Writer's Path

by Michael Cristiano

So, you wanna be a writer, huh?

Well, it takes a lot more than just saying so. In fact, one of the most annoying things you can say to a writer is, “I wanna write a novel too, but I…”

And there you go. Insert some excuse as if us writers have somehow been able to get out of things that would keep regular people from attempting a novel or a collection of poetry or short stories. The excuses range from lack of time to lack of inspiration, from not having anything to say to having too much to say (see my post called “Why I’d Rather Pass a Kidney Stone than Talk about my Writing” where I delve into this phrase further).

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Favorite Writing Advice: Adding Tension to Your Story

A Writer's Path

by John Briggs

One simple idea can give your story much-needed tension.

One phrase — one sentence, really — can help most authors make their stories more tense, more dramatic, more gripping.

“If your characters ever meet you, they should punch you in the face.”

I don’t know who said it, but that may be the best piece of writing advice I’ve ever read. Unfortunately, most authors don’t seem to follow it.

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Three Ways to Deal With the Feeling of Loss after Finishing a Highly Inspired Creative Project

A Writer's Path



by Pekoeblaze

Truly inspired creative projects have a strange kind of “magic” to them. You might not realise that you’re making something that you’ll always remember fondly when you’re actually making it. But, after you’ve finished one of these amazing, inspired creative projects, then you can sometimes feel a sense of loss. A sense of forlorn nostalgia for the time when you were still making it.

It’s a sense that there was a beautiful moment, but now it has passed into the mists of time. There’s a sense that if you made the same project again, you wouldn’t quite be able to recapture the same sense of fascination, joy and effortless inspiration that you felt when you made it for the first time.

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Prologues and Epilogues – Is There a Point to Them?

A Writer's Path

books

by Helena Fairfax

Prologue and Epilogue. Do they have a use? Should they be used? Can you have one without the other?

First of all, the Prologue. Oh, the dreaded question of the prologue for writers. How I’ve agonised over this at times.

According to my useful friend Wikipedia, a prologue is: an opening to a story that establishes the context and gives background details, often some earlier story that ties into the main one, and other miscellaneous information.

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