Writing Tips: Live a Lot, Write a Lot

A Writer's Path

adventure live

by Liam Cross

If you’re anything like me (someone who loves the outdoors to begin with) then this won’t be an issue for you. Chances are you make time every now and then to get yourself out to some beautiful, serene spots to enjoy the tranquility of the outdoor world and all that comes with it.

You probably use this time as a means to clear your mind, a tool to relieve the stresses that develop due to everyday life and also as a way to remind yourself that you are a small spec on the window which is our colossal earth and that in turn, the earth is just a small spec on the window that is our universe.

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How to Get a Great Cover Design for Your Self-Published Book

A Writer's Path

design computer

by Kate M. Colby

Readers do judge books by their covers, and your cover is your #1 marketing tool. For new independent authors, acquiring a book cover is a thrilling, but daunting, task. Once your book has a cover, it looks like a “real” book. The cover is something tangible you can show your friends and family — I know for me, my book cover reveal was the moment when my loved ones realized I had actually written a novel.

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4 Creativity Lessons We Can Learn from David Bowie’s Rich Artistic Career

A Writer's Path

classroom four

by Maja S. Todorovi

In January 8, 2017, we celebrated David Bowie’s 70th birthday and marked a year of his passing. Let us remember how great artist he was:

Ever since I was a little kid, as a great fan of gothic and mythological stories, my first recollection of David Bowie has to do with his role in the movie Hunger. Along with that came an interest in his music and artistic work, which later translated in true admiration.

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4 Ways to Handle Backstory

A Writer's Path

Four 4

By Andrea Lundgren

Every story has exposition–details of the character and world that you, as the author, need to pass on to the reader. You’ve spent hours fleshing out the world of your story and learning about your characters, and now you have to find some way of getting this information (or at least the essential part) from your head to the readers’. (This is especially true in science fiction and fantasy, where you need to tell how the world of the story differs from our world.)

So what’s an author to do?

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Here are 2 Important Things I Learned While Writing This Book

A Writer's Path

by Stephanie O’Brien

This is an exciting week for me. My latest novel, Catgirl Roommate, is finally complete!

If you enjoy funny stories about cats (or humans with the ears, tail and mind of cats), and you want to laugh, roll your eyes, and say “I know, right? My cat does that too!”, I highly recommend that you get yourself a copy!

Creating this novel was an interesting challenge, with some big bumps along the road. Today, I want to share two success tips I got while writing Catgirl Roommate, as well as how to use those tips in your own life.

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Writing to Market – What Does It Mean?

A Writer's Path

office market writing

By Julianne Q. Johnson

Should a novelist write to market? Should they avoid writing to market like the plague? Should they write to trend or to tropes? What does it all mean?

Take heart, gentle reader, I will do my level best to tell you what it means.

To start with, my research shows these terms to be a bit fluid. If you ask different people in the know, you might get different answers. The following is my understanding of the terms and what they mean.

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Why You’re Not You When You’re Not Writing

A Writer's Path

writing tea

by Meg Dowell

For the first week of 2017, because of the new year, I did not write any articles. Clients either weren’t ready to assign them yet or they were having me work on other projects (because being a content creator means you get to write marketing emails too).

For many of you, this probably doesn’t sound like that big a deal. But you have to understand that the nature of my work resulted in me writing over 500 articles last year – that doesn’t include these blog posts. I write articles. It is what people pay me to do. And having already taken a week off of work between the Christmas and New Year’s holidays, enduring another week without producing an article was like going without food: it was unbearable.

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