Favorite Writing Advice: Adding Tension to Your Story

A Writer's Path

by John Briggs

One simple idea can give your story much-needed tension.

One phrase — one sentence, really — can help most authors make their stories more tense, more dramatic, more gripping.

“If your characters ever meet you, they should punch you in the face.”

I don’t know who said it, but that may be the best piece of writing advice I’ve ever read. Unfortunately, most authors don’t seem to follow it.

View original post 763 more words

Three Ways to Deal With the Feeling of Loss after Finishing a Highly Inspired Creative Project

A Writer's Path



by Pekoeblaze

Truly inspired creative projects have a strange kind of “magic” to them. You might not realise that you’re making something that you’ll always remember fondly when you’re actually making it. But, after you’ve finished one of these amazing, inspired creative projects, then you can sometimes feel a sense of loss. A sense of forlorn nostalgia for the time when you were still making it.

It’s a sense that there was a beautiful moment, but now it has passed into the mists of time. There’s a sense that if you made the same project again, you wouldn’t quite be able to recapture the same sense of fascination, joy and effortless inspiration that you felt when you made it for the first time.

View original post 944 more words

Prologues and Epilogues – Is There a Point to Them?

A Writer's Path

books

by Helena Fairfax

Prologue and Epilogue. Do they have a use? Should they be used? Can you have one without the other?

First of all, the Prologue. Oh, the dreaded question of the prologue for writers. How I’ve agonised over this at times.

According to my useful friend Wikipedia, a prologue is: an opening to a story that establishes the context and gives background details, often some earlier story that ties into the main one, and other miscellaneous information.

View original post 591 more words

Writing Tips: Live a Lot, Write a Lot

A Writer's Path

adventure live

by Liam Cross

If you’re anything like me (someone who loves the outdoors to begin with) then this won’t be an issue for you. Chances are you make time every now and then to get yourself out to some beautiful, serene spots to enjoy the tranquility of the outdoor world and all that comes with it.

You probably use this time as a means to clear your mind, a tool to relieve the stresses that develop due to everyday life and also as a way to remind yourself that you are a small spec on the window which is our colossal earth and that in turn, the earth is just a small spec on the window that is our universe.

View original post 660 more words

How to Get a Great Cover Design for Your Self-Published Book

A Writer's Path

design computer

by Kate M. Colby

Readers do judge books by their covers, and your cover is your #1 marketing tool. For new independent authors, acquiring a book cover is a thrilling, but daunting, task. Once your book has a cover, it looks like a “real” book. The cover is something tangible you can show your friends and family — I know for me, my book cover reveal was the moment when my loved ones realized I had actually written a novel.

View original post 1,080 more words

4 Creativity Lessons We Can Learn from David Bowie’s Rich Artistic Career

A Writer's Path

classroom four

by Maja S. Todorovi

In January 8, 2017, we celebrated David Bowie’s 70th birthday and marked a year of his passing. Let us remember how great artist he was:

Ever since I was a little kid, as a great fan of gothic and mythological stories, my first recollection of David Bowie has to do with his role in the movie Hunger. Along with that came an interest in his music and artistic work, which later translated in true admiration.

View original post 530 more words

4 Ways to Handle Backstory

A Writer's Path

Four 4

By Andrea Lundgren

Every story has exposition–details of the character and world that you, as the author, need to pass on to the reader. You’ve spent hours fleshing out the world of your story and learning about your characters, and now you have to find some way of getting this information (or at least the essential part) from your head to the readers’. (This is especially true in science fiction and fantasy, where you need to tell how the world of the story differs from our world.)

So what’s an author to do?

View original post 1,059 more words